Equine De-worming

Current recommendations

Introduction

Overall aim – prevent contamination of environment with eggs

Recommended Protocol

  1. Faecal egg count (McMaster’s method)
    • Quantitive test counting the number of worm eggs per gram
    • Results
      • < 200epg – low contaminator
      • 200-500epg – moderate contaminator
      • >500epg – high contaminator
    • Testing
      • Twice a year – March/April and September/October
      • All new horses
      • Fenbendazole or pyrantel – 6-8 weeks after treatment
      • Ivermectin or praziqunatel – 10-12 weeks after treatment
  2. De-worm appropriately
    • Low contaminator – only contribute a small amount to pasture contamination; minimal de-worming required
    • High contaminator – major contributor to pasture contamination; required much more regular, intensive de-worming
  3. Repeat FEC to assess reduction
    • 2 weeks after de-worming
  4. Assess resistance
    • 90-95% reduction = no resistance
    • Insignificant reduction – consider an alternative de-worming product
  5. De-worm with another product if first is ineffective

De-wormers

Which dewormer?

FAQ

Why use this protocol?

What’s wrong with rotating de-wormers?

How does resistance develop?

Why not kill every last worm?